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October 2017. Last Gasps of the Season. PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jos   

Comma

 

 

 

Cold, wet and windy, the tides of October spelling the end to the 2017 butterfly season. In a final little fanfair however, the first few days of the month threw a few unexpected highlights, eleven species of butterfly seen, three fritillary species the most unexpected.

 

 

 

 

 

1 October.

A distinct chill hitting the lands, nights dropping to 5C and days struggling to exceed 10 C. Hardly conducive to butterflies flying, but even in these last gasps of the season, still the limited sunny spells brought a number of butterflies - eleven species on the first day of the month, including 20 Queen of Spain Fritillaries, one Weaver's Fritillary and one fairly fresh Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary ...three species of fritillary in October, who would have thought it?!

 

Queen of Spain Fritillary

Weavers Fritillary

Small Pearl-bordered Fritillary

 

Also at least 30 Small Coppers braving the elements, two Eastern Bath Whites and a half dozen Pale Clouded Yellows. As for the rest, a single Small White, a single Green-veined White, a single Small Tortoiseshell, a single Red Admiral and two Commas.

 

 

2-7 October. The End.



Small Copper

 

Patchy sun and a cold wind on 2nd October - a return to the grasslands that had produced the impressive numbers of butterflies in the preceding days failed to do likewise. Till 11 a.m., not a single butterfly was seen, then in weak sun and the nippy winds, finally a few brave butterflies appeared - a grand total of three species and 13 individual butterflies ...one Green-veined White, seven Small Coppers, five Queen of Spain Fritillaries.

 

 


Thereafter, days of heavy rain and low temperatures, pretty much ending the season so I thought. A brief respite on the 7th October did however bring the final stragglers, three Small Whites at Labanoras ...most surely my last butterflies of the year in Lithuania.

 

Migrant Hawker

Migrant Hawker

 

Despite the dismal weather, still a few dragonflies about too - Common Darters widespread and even on the wing in moderately bright patches, plus Migrant Hawkers in a couple of locations.

 

 

 

  CLICK HERE to return to the full account of the year

 

 

Last Updated ( Monday, 09 October 2017 )
 
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